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Archive for June, 2010

6-29-10

This morning the little stallions were looking out at their new world. They will be staying at the old facility until they can be taken to the vet for evaluation and gelding operations.

The poor little white guy is so uncomfortable with his hooves. He has a vet appointment on Wednesday.

At the rescue, Dually was making a splash, literally! He loves to play in the water.
He even loves to drink water right out of the hose.
For good measure, he likes to pick up the hose and play with it.
He tries his best to spray other horses and people if they get too close. So far he hasn’t managed to spray any horses, but he has gotten really close to spraying some people. We would like to thank everyone again who donated to the well fund, it is such a blessing to have an endless stream of water. Without your donation, this water would not be possible.
Jason got to work on the office getting it ready for contractor Mark to come finish it up. The ceiling had glued on fiberboard, and it all had to be stripped down to the plywood. It was a long, hard, hot, sweaty, dusty job but finally it was all finished.
On Sunday we had the family come out who wanted to add some goats to their family. Today was the day for them to get transported to their lovely new home. The two Nubians were loaded up, someone else is adopting the black one Cookie Dough. The two little fat Nigerian Dwarfs from yesterdays rescue were also loaded up.
Soon they had arrived and Tawnee opened the door and looked inside. They seemed a little bewildered and wondered what was going on.
The two little Nigerian Dwarfs were led to their new pen where their new buddies were waiting for them. Their little girls were so excited with the new family members! Their pen is a little hilly with big rocks for the goats to have fun jumping on, so maybe this guy can work on trimming his waist down a little bit.
Then the Nubians were led down. We would like to thank this family for giving these rescued goats such a lovely home where they will never be eaten.
This eBay Giving Works item is just so cute. It is a Wrangler Diaper Cover and size 3 cowboy boots. They are in like new condition they still have the original price tag on them. The starting bid is only $10, and 25% of the sale price goes to help the horses. To bid on this item, click here.
Many thanks to Anonymous, Gail G., Patricia M. – in memory of Dear Heart, for their very generous donations!
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6-28-10

This morning Jason and Tawnee headed up the Feather River Canyon to help some horses in need of a new home. It is such a beautiful drive this time of year, beautiful green trees, rugged rocks and a lovely river.

If you have never driven Hwy 70 from Oroville to Quincy, you have missed out on many exciting sights including a few tunnels.

Since we were in the area we stopped by Quincy Stables to see if they had any horses they wanted to surrender. Terry surrendered this sweet old gal from his riding program as her leg was getting to be in too bad of shape to carry kids anymore.
Then it was back on the road to the next pickup spot.
The next stop was picking up 4 little mini’s who had been severely neglected and then abandoned.
This little guy is so incredibly cute! He is a 5 year old miniature stallion, who will soon be a 5 year old miniature gelding. When the lady who arranged for us to pick up these minis came home, this little guy was tied to her fence, abandoned at her house. How sad.
His feet are in poor shape, but not the worst Jason and Tawnee saw today.
Here is the story on this poor little guy: “The previous owner sold him to a family. This was almost 3 years ago. In response to a comment from a neighbor of the family to this previous owner, she had driven by several times in the last few months. Yesterday she got a bad feeling, and drove over there this morning. The house is vacant. She went around to the back, and found the stallion, starving and with hooves like nightmares, he looks like he had not been trimmed in the whole time they had him.”
Poor little guy, it is so heartless to have left him behind when they moved.
Just look at those incredibly sad hooves.
It is unimaginable to us how someone could allow their sweet little mini to get into this condition and do nothing about it. These are the worst mini feet we have ever seen.
There were also 2 little goats who needed a home as well. It’s a good thing we have a big trailer!
The drive back was quite long and uneventful other than the sunshine glaring right into the windshield.
Soon it had slipped behind the hills making absolutely stunning silhouets.
Once they came out of the canyon Jason and Tawnee were met with an absolutely spectacular sunset. You know how much Tawnee loves taking pictures of sunsets!
Many thanks to Diane P. for her generous donation to the Dano Fund. Please remember that the Dano Fund is used to help horses just like the ones in todays blog. If you would like to contribute to Dano’s Fund to help these little mini’s, please click here. There are going to be gelding costs, xrays, medical care, the list goes on and on.

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6-27-10

We would like to give a huge “Thank You!” to the contractor, Mark, who has volunteered time and material to get the office looking absolutely stunning. His enthusiasm is just amazing and really inspiring to all those at the rescue.

There is so much to do! Mark has been getting materials donated. So far he has gotten two a/c units donated, one for the tack room, one for the med room and a refrigerator for the medicines, an indoor and an outdoor sink, and some other stuff. We told him that if there was anything we needed to get to finish it off just let us know. Jason headed into town (yes Jason is feeling a bit better, but both eardrums have burst and he only has 10% of his hearing) with a short list to get the needed items so Mark can keep working on it tomorrow.

The office is being stripped down to the rough structure, there was some water damage to the existing paneling.
We had some folks come out today who are interesting in adopting some goats. They really fell in love with them and hope to add some more goats to their family soon.
It was the hottest day we have had yet at Phoenix Fields. Yahoo Weather says it was 102 degrees today and we believe them.
As we all know the best way to cool off is to get wet. Having lots of water at Phoenix Fields makes it very easy to cool all the animals off. The horses love coming up to the fence to get sprayed off. One will come up, get all wet, and leave to go roll in the dirt. Then another horse comes up for his turn at getting all wet. What fun!
Then a horse trailer pulled into the rescue. Another horse who’s owner could no longer keep her.
The new horse looked all around with amazement, so many new horses to meet.
We would like you to meet Gummy Girl, a 17 year off the track TB mare that had been used as a brood mare. She is trained to lead and is looking for a home where she can hang out in the pasture and look beautiful.
Tawnee and April spent a large part of the day with Lily, the 2 year old that came off the KB trailer that had been used for Mexican roping. She has so many fears of people and ropes. She has a long ways to go to get her trust back. Poor girl!
After about 2 hours in the hot sun Tawnee was able to rub her neck, which then Lily’s eyes grew wide and her lips began to twitch.
She just couldn’t believe that after two hours of silly people trying to get close to her, all they wanted to do was rub her neck and make her feel so good. It is so nice to be able to show her some love and kindness, and that there are humans out there who really do care and will be kind to her. It’s nice being able to show her that life is not just about being roped and thrown on the ground while people laugh and cheer.
We received an email today that we sent out in a special E-News. This poor donkey was abused so bad. It reminded us of Spring Bo’s owner, letting the animal get in such bad condition and then shooting it. Thankfully Spring Bo’s owner hasn’t shot him yet, but he has stated repeatedly that he is planning on it. If you didn’t read about this poor donkey, please take a moment to read about it and write a letter to those that can make a difference. Please be respectful and courteous in your communication with the authorities. To read about the donkey, click here.
We know you all enjoy reading the blog, just a FYI, this is the 800th post. If you have read all 800, we would love to hear from you!
Thank you so much for your donations and support that make our rescue efforts possible! Sara H., Andrew C., Karen B., Constance W., LKW Sporthorses, all donated to make the rescue possible.

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We need your help! We received an email about a very poor donkey with a ruthless owner. It reminded us of Spring Bo’s owner so much! Wait until they get bad enough, then shoot them. Humane euthanasia by chemical injection is the kindest possible option for an animal that is in this condition. So many times animals suffer needlessly due to a prideful owners arrogance with the thought that they know how to put an animal down themselves. The article is below, this person must pay the consequences of his abuse! Please send thoughtful, courteous letters to the people in charge of the situation listed below the article.
If you would like to visit the website of the person who did this to this poor donkey, you can by clicking here.
Hopefully they make an example out of this human, please take a moment of your time and send a letter today!
Mendocino organic farmer charged with animal cruelty

Suspected of neglecting, shooting aging burro

Mendocino County organic farmer Guinness McFadden is charged with severely neglecting his aging burro, then shoot it multiple times while attempting to put it out of its misery. The burro’s hooves grew so long that it was forced to walk on its fetlocks. It also suffered from large tumors.


By
GLENDA ANDERSON
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT

Published: Monday, May 17, 2010

A well-known Mendocino County organic farmer and wine maker is facing trial on misdemeanor charges of animal neglect and cruelty. Guinness McFadden severely neglected his aging burro, then shot it multiple times while attempting to put it out of its misery, according to a report by Mendocino County Sheriff’s Deputy Christian Denton.

McFadden, an outspoken Potter Valley rancher who specializes in organic winegrapes, herbs, rice and cattle, declined to comment on the charges filed by the Mendocino County District Attorney’s Office.

According to the Sheriff’s report, the burro had been neglected for years. Its hooves had been allowed to grow to more than a foot in length, causing them to spiral and bend at 90 degree angles, according to the report. The deformities forced the burro to walk on its fetlocks instead of its twisted hooves, photos of the animal show.

“The animal appeared to be in pain and had extreme trouble walking,” Denton states in the report. The burro also had an oozing, volley ball-sized tumor on its chest, according to the Sheriff’s report.

McFadden had been aware of the hoof problem since at least June 2007, when Animal Control officials first warned him to have the burro’s hooves trimmed, according to the Sheriff’s report.

He was again warned in early 2009, when the burro’s condition was reported to the Humane Society, according to Denton’s report. McFadden claimed he had a farrier trim the hooves, but the overgrown hooves would have required multiple treatments.Guinness McFadden severely neglected his aging burro, then shot it multiple times while attempting to put it out of its misery, according to a report by Mendocino County Sheriff’s Deputy Christian Denton.

McFadden, an outspoken Potter Valley rancher who specializes in organic winegrapes, herbs, rice and cattle, declined to comment on the charges filed by the Mendocino County District Attorney’s Office.

According to the Sheriff’s report, the burro had been neglected for years. Its hooves had been allowed to grow to more than a foot in length, causing them to spiral and bend at 90 degree angles, according to the report. The deformities forced the burro to walk on its fetlocks instead of its twisted hooves, photos of the animal show.

“The animal appeared to be in pain and had extreme trouble walking,” Denton states in the report.

The burro also had an oozing, volley ball-sized tumor on its chest, according to the Sheriff’s report.

McFadden had been aware of the hoof problem since at least June 2007, when Animal Control officials first warned him to have the burro’s hooves trimmed, according to the Sheriff’s report.

He was again warned in early 2009, when the burro’s condition was reported to the Humane Society, according to Denton’s report. McFadden claimed he had a farrier trim the hooves, but the overgrown hooves would have required multiple treatments.

The burro also apparently suffered from laminitis, a hoof inflammation usually brought on by eating carbohydrate rich grass or clover, said county Veterinarian Robert Shugart. Untreated, the inflammation can result in abnormal hoof growth as the animal shifts its weight to its heel to lessen the pain, he said. Hooves can become as long and twisted as those of McFadden’s burro in about a year, Shugart said.

In the wild, burros don’t have access to rich grass, and their hooves are naturally worn down by hard, rocky ground. Their hooves may get longer as they age and become less mobile, but predators are likely to cut short their suffering, according to county Animal Control and Bureau of Land Management officials.

“Typically, they won’t live that long,” said BLM spokesman Jeff Fontana. Wild burros’ typical life span is about 20 years, he said. McFadden’s burro was about 35 years old. By January of this year, its hooves had grown to almost 16 inches, according to the Sheriff’s report.

Appalled, Potter Valley PG&E power plant employees phoned the Sheriff’s Office, which oversees animal control enforcement. The burro was grazing on land adjacent to the power plant, which McFadden leases from PG&E for his cattle.

When he saw the burro’s condition, Denton told McFadden he needed to get the animal immediate care or put it down. He said he was surprised by the animal’s condition. “McFadden is well to do and raises cattle, among several other businesses, and could easily afford veterinary care for his animals,” Denton said.

McFadden told him he infrequently sees the burro, the last of four he adopted about 30 years ago through the Bureau of Land Management’s wild horse and burro program. McFadden asked Denton to help him shoot the burro, but Denton was ordered to another assignment and had to leave, according to the report. He instructed McFadden to shoot the burro behind the ear.Guinness McFadden severely neglected his aging burro, then shot it multiple times while attempting to put it out of its misery, according to a report by Mendocino County Sheriff’s Deputy Christian DentoMcFadden, an outspoken Potter Valley rancher who specializes in organic winegrapes, herbs, rice and cattle, declined to comment on the charges filed by the Mendocino County District Attorney’s Office.

According to the Sheriff’s report, the burro had been neglected for years. Its hooves had been allowed to grow to more than a foot in length, causing them to spiral and bend at 90 degree angles, according to the report. The deformities forced the burro to walk on its fetlocks instead of its twisted hooves, photos of the animal show.

“The animal appeared to be in pain and had extreme trouble walking,” Denton states in the report.

The burro also had an oozing, volley ball-sized tumor on its chest, according to the Sheriff’s report.

McFadden had been aware of the hoof problem since at least June 2007, when Animal Control officials first warned him to have the burro’s hooves trimmed, according to the Sheriff’s report.

He was again warned in early 2009, when the burro’s condition was reported to the Humane Society, according to Denton’s report. McFadden claimed he had a farrier trim the hooves, but the overgrown hooves would have required multiple treatments.

The burro also apparently suffered from laminitis, a hoof inflammation usually brought on by eating carbohydrate rich grass or clover, said county Veterinarian Robert Shugart. Untreated, the inflammation can result in abnormal hoof growth as the animal shifts its weight to its heel to lessen the pain, he said. Hooves can become as long and twisted as those of McFadden’s burro in about a year, Shugart said.

In the wild, burros don’t have access to rich grass, and their hooves are naturally worn down by hard, rocky ground. Their hooves may get longer as they age and become less mobile, but predators are likely to cut short their suffering, according to county Animal Control and Bureau of Land Management officials.

“Typically, they won’t live that long,” said BLM spokesman Jeff Fontana. Wild burros’ typical life span is about 20 years, he said. McFadden’s burro was about 35 years old.

By January of this year, its hooves had grown to almost 16 inches, according to the Sheriff’s report.

Appalled, Potter Valley PG&E power plant employees phoned the Sheriff’s Office, which oversees animal control enforcement. The burro was grazing on land adjacent to the power plant, which McFadden leases from PG&E for his cattle.

When he saw the burro’s condition, Denton told McFadden he needed to get the animal immediate care or put it down.

He said he was surprised by the animal’s condition.

“McFadden is well to do and raises cattle, among several other businesses, and could easily afford veterinary care for his animals,” Denton said.

McFadden told him he infrequently sees the burro, the last of four he adopted about 30 years ago through the Bureau of Land Management’s wild horse and burro program.

McFadden asked Denton to help him shoot the burro, but Denton was ordered to another assignment and had to leave, according to the report. He instructed McFadden to shoot the burro behind the ear.

A witness to the shooting said McFadden began shooting the burro with a pistol from a distance of about 30 feet. The first bullet skipped off the animal’s head, according to power plant manager T.K. Vaught. The second shot was into the animal’s neck, causing it to fall to the ground, she said. McFadden reportedly continued walking toward the animal while firing. The fifth and final shot he fired was at point blank range into the animal’s head, Vaught said. “It was awful,” she told Denton.

Three high-profile attorneys have been involved with McFadden’s defense. They include David Eyster, a candidate for district attorney on the June ballot; Keith Faulder, former assistant district attorney; and Ann Moorman, a candidate for judge. Eyster declined to comment on details of the case, but said he thought it was poorly handled. “I don’t think the right thing is being done,” he said.

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Another Burro Suffers at the Hands of Man – Letters and emails needed!

June 26, 2010 by Crystal Ward, donkranch@comcast.net

If you just read the disturbing article about the elderly burro who died with 16” long hooves and a huge tumor, you also understand this type of severe abuse didn’t happen overnight.

Two things come to mind. It’s interesting to note this well-off organic farmer didn’t seem it was important enough to call out a veterinarian or farrier for the suffering burro even though animal control was involved in 2007 and again in 2009. It’s also unfortunate that animal control didn’t do any follow-up visits on this case of neglect. WHY didn’t animal control return to see if the animal was being properly cared for after their initial visit? WHY didn’t animal control come out to cite the owner or seize the donkey when it was apparent the owner did not care for his burro?

Although most of us would dearly love to serve on the jury should this case end up in court (and we lived in Mendocino county), I doubt it will go that far. It appears that Guiness McFadden has already retained not one, but three high-profile attorneys in his defense. Mr. McFadden will likely come away with his wrist being lightly slapped and will be ordered to take better care of his livestock. Funny how he refused to spend a dime on his suffering burro, yet has unlimited funds to retain attorneys.

All too often, people still think it’s o.k. for burros (donkeys) to be turned loose on pastures 24/7. It is not! Burros are not horses, and they will founder in this situation. Historically burros come from desert environments. Burros have a different metabolism than horses or cattle. Some will founder within a few months, some take a few years, but over time, fat pads develop on burros and laminitis occurs. It’s difficult or quite often impossible to reverse the effects of laminitis. Burros need their dietary requirements closely monitored. The easy way out is to put them in a pasture and just walk away. Sooner or later, the burro will suffer from the neglectful owner, just as this burro did in Mendocino county. Burros, like horses, also need routine hoof care by a knowledgeable farrier. Proper veterinary care is imperative for any animal who suffers from tumors. Unfortunately for this burro in Mendocino county, it suffered needlessly at the hands of a neglectful owner for many, many years.

What can you do? We desperately need your letters! This case was initially supposed to start on June 21st. It has been postponed now until August 30th. There’s a good chance they will “settle” prior to a costly court case. I do not live in Mendocino county. If you receive this email and live in Mendocino county (northern California Coastline), I/we really need you to respond. As with any case, letters will hold more weight from the “locals”.

Please forward this letter/email to any newspaper, magazine, or animal owner who might spare the time to write letters. If we can inundate the following people with letters from all over the country to voice our support of prosecuting Mr. McFadden to the maximum penalty allowed by law, while at the same time requesting a full investigation as to why Animal Control failed to perform follow-up visits on this neglected burro. Two wrongs do not make a right, and unfortunately for this suffering burro, he led a very painful, agonizing life. Thank you in advance for your time and compassion. c.w.

Send your letters to the following;

Deputy District Attorney Katherine Houston

501 Low Gap Road
Ukiah, CA 96482

email; Houstonk@co.mendocino.ca.us


Mendocino County Animal Control

George Hodgeson, Senior Animal Control Officer

298 Plant Road

Ukiah, CA 95482

email; Hodgsong@co.mendocino.ca.us


Animal Control Sgt. Scott Poma

951 Low Gap Road

Ukiah, CA 95482

email; Pomas@co.mendocino.ca.us


Journalist; Glenda Anderson, Press Democrat

215 West Standley St., Suite 4

Ukiah, CA 95482

email; Glenda.anderson@pressdemocrat.com


Letters To The Editor

(200 words or less, leave your name, address & ph. number)

The Press Democrat

P.O. Box 569

Santa Rosa, CA 95402

email; letters@pressdemocrat.com


cc; Crystal Ward

P.O. Box 246

Placerville, CA 95667

email; donkranch@comcast.net

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6-25-10

This didn’t make it into Monday’s blog because we hadn’t gotten the pictures off the camera yet, but Strawberry got adopted! For many of our long-time followers, they may remember Sebastian, a beautiful Palomino gelding, from a long time ago. They had adopted him and loved him for many years, but sadly last year they lost him to colic. They wanted to add a new family member, and they all fell in love with Strawberry. We just know that Strawberry is going to a great home!

We gave all of our staff Tuesday off so they could emotionally deal with what had happened Sunday.

Wednesday was a day at the vet. Rose, the lame mare from the KB, needed to go and be evaluated. Ace needed to go for a pre-adoption exam.
The hay guys brought out a load of hay, the horses sure love seeing the hay guys show up, but the pocket book doesn’t! It is definitely one of the top 3 expenses of the rescue. The other two top expenses are vet care and rescue expenses.
Tawnee headed off with Rose, Ace and some horses that had come in early for the euthanasia clinic who where not adoptable. Wednesday was also the euthanasia clinic day. Our next euthanasia clinic is going to be July 14th. It sure is bug season, in no time at all the windshield was coated with poor bugs.
Ace and Rose were put in stalls so they could get their examinations done. Ace was wide eyed, taking everything in.
Rose had come from the KB and was very lame.
We feared that she had severely foundered and we thought her coffin bone might be really rotated.
Thanks to Dano’s fund we have the resources to get her x-rays done to find out for sure what is going on in there.
To our greatest relief the x-ray showed that we should be able to save her. Her sole is extremely thin, it is only .19 in thick, far too thin. That would explain why she doesn’t like walking on that leg very much!
Next it was Ace’s turn for his lameness exam.

Dr Weaver put him through his paces.

Round and round, this way and that. It was found that he has an old sole abscess and that was what was causing him trouble. He is on antibiotics and should be just fine in no time.
The euthanasia clinics are always hard, people giving up their beloved horses. It is always comforting knowing that these horses did not end up in the hands of the kb’s or in the slaughter pipeline.
This guy came into the clinic. He is a 9 year old BLM mustang.
He has a large swelling on the outside of his hock. He was given an initial evaluation by our vet to see what was going on. He is going to stay at the vet for further examination to determine if this is something serious.
He sure is a beautiful boy and we hope to bring him into our adoption program.
At the end of the day it was nice to be able to bring Rose back to the rescue with a plan to help her recover. We were afraid we were going to lose her too.

Thursday, April and Larry had a pickup to do, a 30 year old mare. She needed to come to the rescue. April and her kids just fell in love with her and have decided to adopt her. When they were there picking her up, the lady said she needed to get rid of her goats too and asked if they would take them as well.

So now we welcome 3 goats to the rescue.

Mr T wanted to make sure they knew he was boss right from the git-go. They all looked on with amazement at the giant monster.
The goat from the KB health seems to be improving. She is still dreadfully thin, but her appetite is increasing and she is more alert. She enjoys being able to eat grain and nice yummy alfalfa.
This morning, Friday, Ace and Rio were getting ready to load up into the trailer and head to their new home.
Soon they were off.
Their new mom and dad are so happy to finally have their new babies. Thank you so much for giving these guys such a loving home, and for giving Rio a new mommy.
At the rescue, a horse was being surrendered. Meet Mystic, a 7 year old off the track TB. His owner loved him very much, but could no longer keep him due to the economy.
He is a big beautiful boy, pushing 17 hands. He is trained to ride but hasn’t been ridden in awhile. The lady says that every time she does get him ready to ride, she puts him in a roundpen with the saddle and he bucks for awhile. Then when he is done he is just fine for trail riding. It’s just what he likes to do.
Shortly after Mystic came Cooper and Gray Boy’s mom and dad came to adopt them and take them home.
They posed for a quick snapshot for their adoption photo before loading the boys into the trailer. What a wonder way to end this hard week: 4 horses going home on a Friday!
We haven’t featured an eBay Giving Works item for awhile, because there haven’t been any, but today we would like to feature this Dooney and Bourke leather purse. It is currently $3.99 and 50% of the proceeds go to help the rescue! To view this item, click here.

A huge “Thank You!” goes to William E., Becky H., Gail G., Iris L., Elizabeth N., Donetta F., Todd W., Stephanie H., Yuhua Z., Jodi T., Heather R., Constance S., Cristi S., Samantha T. who all donated to save lifes since the last blog. You guys are definitely the horses heros!

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6-21-10

This morning Olive’s mommy came out to spend more time with her. Olive almost fell asleep she was so relaxed with her. It was really touching.

Tawnee had a vet appointment for Pewee (the colt with the bad leg) and Bella (the blind mare) to be checked out. Tawnee had been scratching Pewee last night and he really enjoyed the attention. Today her heart was broken when she put a halter on this baby and found that he was halter trained. Someone, somewhere, had spent the time with him to teach him to lead, but something had gone drastically wrong in his life. He was at some point someones baby, he knew what love was.

Bella, the blind mare, was going to be evaluated at the vet as well. Home at Last Sanctuary had offered to give her a forever home if she was not in untreatable pain and her quality of life was good.
Bella was very willing but was having a hard time getting around. When she came off the KB trailer we didn’t want to make her walk around so we brought food and water to her, but today moving around we could tell something might be seriously wrong on the inside.
She was such a sweet girl and got into the trailer so trustingly.
Out at the vet she was examined. It was determined that she likely had EPM along with other medical problems. Her eye sockets were constantly dripping, and she was in continuous pain, and very old. The vet told us that we should give her the last gift of kindness, so we had to say “Goodbye” to sweet Bella. She knew she was loved and got to enjoy her last bucket of sweet senior feed before drifting off.
Next it was Pewee’s turn to be examined. Just look at that poor leg! We knew there was no hope, but we wanted to document his leg with an x-ray to confirm the visual diagnosis.
What was going on inside was certainly no better than what was happening on the outside. Poor baby, breaking his leg and then having to let it heal in this terrible position. We said “Goodbye” to Peewee as well. It was so sad, but at least he knew love once again and his last thought of humans is not the horrors of the slaughter industry, but love, kindness and gentle words.
The colts were still at the vet. Dipper had been gelded but had not been given his hoof care yet, they were not as severe as the others.
He was wide eyed and wondered what this new adventure would be.
His hooves were not as long because they had been broken off at one point. We don’t know his whole story, but he might have been let out of his stall and moved around more than the other two.
The farrier got right to work.
Dipper was sedated, but you could still see in his face that he wasn’t quite sure that he was enjoying this.
When he was done he loaded right up into the trailer with his waiting buddy Flipper, who had already been loaded.
If anyone does not remember who these colts are, they came to us from the same killer buyer who brought us the last group. They came in on May 31st.
These poor babies would have gone on to Mexico if we did not purchase them for $100 each.

Their hooves were in terrible condition.

But they knew that their life was looking up and waited to see what the future held.
The future definitely got a lot brighter for them. Today they are such beautiful horses, geldings now thanks to your generosity, so young and full of life.
Lucky was also at the vet waiting to come back to the rescue. He recovered just fine from his cryptorchid operation, and is now a beautiful gelding pony. He is waiting to find that wonderful, forever loving home.
Lucky was a good boy and got into the trailer without too much fuss. He must have been happy to come back to the rescue.
At the rescue, Lucky looked around to see the familiar faces of his horse friends. He was hoping they had all found their forever homes while he was gone, but he was glad to see a few had gone home!
Dipper looked out at the rescue with amazement. He couldn’t believe he was back.
Flipper also looked wide eyed around as Tawnee looked down at his cute little hooves. When he left the rescue his hooves were long, but now he is so much better thanks to you!
When everything had settled down at the rescue, Macho Man, Dottie, Parcy and Mr T were all loaded up to go to a kids summer camp for the evening.
It was a good place for the staff to unwind for a little bit and just hang out after the last few hard days. We are giving our staff the 22nd off as they need some time to prevent compassion fatigue. It is always important after a really hard rescue to be able to get away from it for a little bit and deal with it emotionally. The next blog will be on Thursday, keep an eye on Facebook as most likely there will be a few posts on there before the next blog.
We would like to thank you all so much for donating to the Dano Fund and to help care for the new group of poor horses from the killer buyer. Enough funds have been donated for their purchase and initial care, thank you so much!
Thank you Mary G. – Kathleen T. – Sue T. – Ruthann C. – Barbara B. – Joni M. – Adrian D. – Stacey S. – Betsy B. – Carla G. – Flying Pig Antiques and Collectibles – Anna S. – Pamela N. –
Lori S. – Stacie L. – Dianna S. – Donna A. – Sarah E. – Scott D. – Cynthia S. – Glennis R. – Fran B. – Lisa W. – Janice M. – Cynthia B. – Sheree D. – Melissa G. – Ann H. – Natalie K. – Anna G. – Betsy B. – Suzanne F. – Kerrith V. – Becky H. – Iris L. for donating, your donations are greatly appreciated!

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6-20-10

Today Tawnee cried. It takes a lot to make Tawnee cry on the job, but by the end of the day, she had an emotional breakdown…
But first off, happy Fathers Day! If it was not for our Dads out there who get the hay, unload the hay, build the fence for our first horse or pony, stay up all night walking your poor colicing horse, if it was not for our Dads our horsey world would be so hard. So once again Happy Fathers Day!

Larry was enjoying his Father’s Day at the rescue, Jason was spending his Father’s Day sick in bed, poor guy. Jason has a double ear infection, is on 2 antibiotics and has about 10% of his hearing left. Let’s hope that is not permanent.

It was hot and it was decided that Parcy could use a bath and since there were a lot of kids who were hot to it was the perfect way to cool off.
Parcy enjoyed his bath and the kids had a lot of fun.
Ace’s new mom and dad came out to spend some time with him, he is so beautiful!
He was a very good boy and they really fell head over heels for him.
Olive’s new mom came out to be with her today too. She just can’t wait to be able to adopt her and take her home.

One of our previous adopters came by, they are looking to add another horse to their family. He is a contractor, and Larry asked if he would be able to help with the office trailer, if he had any scraps laying around that he could donate and put them up to make it look better. He was more than happy to offer his time and any items he could find. This is such a huge blessing! Larry and Alex gutted it out and it had been sitting ever since we didn’t have the time or materials to get it put back together. The med room is painted, but the office area hadn’t been tackled yet. He made a list of what is needed. THANK YOU!

It is really nice having lots of water. The horses enjoy standing by the fence and getting sprayed off while the water troughs are being filled.

Now the hard part of the day came. Tawnee had been in communication with the same killer buyer who brought the 4 horses a few weeks ago. He was heading down south to a staging area for horses being sent to slaughter. He said he could bring some horses back to the rescue if we could pay him $100 each for them. The rescue only had cash for 3-4 horses. He asked if we could do 6. Tawnee said she would see what she could pull together, and he said he would be there on Sunday.
When the trailer pulled up it was loaded with horses. He backed up to the round pen to unload. When the door opened Tawnee had to look away. There was a poor horse down in the cram packed full trailer. Then the KB said that there was a goat in there too. The horses started unloading. It was just heart wrenching. He brought back 7 horses, which Tawnee found the money to pay for. He wanted $50 for the goat, but we had no money for her, but April couldn’t let the goat stay with the KB, so she bought the poor goat.
The first horse is a beautiful 2 year old filly who was at the staging area waiting to be sent to slaughter.
While she was waiting, people had fun at her expense by roping her mexican style, around the legs. Her legs are swollen and have rope burns.
The 2nd horse is one of 3 horses that were dropped off at the staging area, they were on their way from Washington to Mexico, and were unloaded off a double decker because they were too weak to make the final leg of the trip to slaughter.
This poor baby broke his leg at one time and it was clearly never treated. It healed up all wrong. From his hoof growth you can tell he has been in this condition for awhile. Every step he takes you can see pain fill his eyes.
Next is a old pony, no doubt he has given hundreds of children rides on his back, and when he was old, his life was thrown away.
This mare was foundered and we are not sure how severely foundered she is.
Another little pony, she is older and a little wild.
This is another one of the horses that was dropped off at the staging area. She is completely blind, both of her eyes are gone. It is so sad that she had to be put in a double decker crammed full of other horses.
It must have been terrorizing for her.
Flies were swarming her face and eye sockets.
She put her face up to Tawnee’s face, and sat there for awhile. Tawnee told her that everything would be alright now, as she was trying to hold back the tears.
The poor horse that was down in the front of the trailer, the KB could not get up. So he put a rope around his neck and pulled the poor baby out his side door. Tawnee wanted to confirm with him that Mexico takes the skinny horses. His own words were “Yup, Mexico takes the little rats.”
The poor little guy got up, and then everyone could see how crippled he was. He could barely walk. Every step was agony on his poor twisted leg.
It wasn’t long before he was back down, the poor little guy is so emaciated. What a terrible life he had been living!
He was all bones. It was so hard to see.
At first he was scared when Larry approached, but soon he realized that he was in a better place, a place where people would not kick him, electrocute him, do what they could to get him to load into trailers for rides from place to place. Now he was at a place where people cared about him.
Everyone at the rescue was having a hard time keeping it together emotionally.
Larry gently stroked his face as little eyes that had been so fearful softened with peace. There was only one name that could be given this precious boy: Dano. Dano is Spanish for “hurt” and not was Dano hurt, but his abuse brought hurt to everyones hearts.
Dano’s poor little leg was so mangled, so twisted and deformed. The length of his hoof told us he has been suffering in this condition for a long time. His teeth told us that he was about a year and a half old.
We wanted to make him as comfortable as possible and get him some yummy sweet feed. He really enjoyed it and you could see that he knew his troubles were over.
He was dehydrated, had a runny nose, fever, and was in a lot of pain. Tawnee sedated him to ease him from his suffering and make him more comfortable. There was so little life left in this precious boy that he simply fell asleep forever, for the first time in his life knowing love and compassion. The first time he knew someone cared. That is all he was staying alive for, hanging onto the thread of life, hoping to meet someone nice before his suffering ended. Everyone’s hearts were broken. This had been one of the toughest things ever to have to go through. Knowing he was no longer in pain and he knew love was all they could take to heart.
It’s hard to imagine that this poor goat was in the trailer crowded full of horses. It’s a wonder she is still alive. Thank you April for saving her life!
The other horses were settling in and getting comfortable. They were really beginning to enjoy basic needs that every horse deserves: food and water.
The poor blind girl enjoyed having a fly mask and some medication on her sore skin that was raw from her eye sockets dripping.
The older little pony knew that life was looking up too. Looking into these precious faces helped ease the pain that Tawnee, April and Larry were feeling.
On the way back home after leaving the rescue, Tawnee turned the truck cam on herself. She was frustrated and had to get her frustrations and hurt out. She was a little reluctant to share this, but if it will help wake people up to the suffering that horses go through in the slaughter pipeline, she hopes that it can do some good. To watch the video, click here.
We had to pay $700 to get these horses from the killer buyer, and as you know that is only the start to their care. Any donations are greatly appreciated in honor of Dano. Dano had no reason to suffer, no reason to live an entire life full of agony and abuse because people didn’t care, or worse, people enjoyed making him suffer. This fund will be used to rescue and care for more horses like Dano. Please donate to Dano’s Fund, click here today.

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